all who wander are not lost

I was wrong about the designation of this former building – (I called it an YMCA), as well as being wrong about it being refurbished. This was the former Salvation Army Booth Memorial Hospital. Another interesting and important part of Detroits history reduced to rubble.

[Angela ads: That’s actually not a YMCA, but the Salvation Army’s Booth Memorial Hospital. It was one of many set up across the US back in the days when umwed teenage motherhood was taboo and the girls from proper families were sent to facilities such as Booth, the Daughter’s of Charity’s Marillac homes, or Florence Crittenton homes to have their babies and then put them up for adoption.]

5 Responses to Booth Memorial

  • This is where I was born.

  • I was born at William Booth in 1952. My parents were Hungarian immigrants and most likely couldn’t afford the hospital bill since they were working for the Daughters of Divine Charity, so it did take more than unwed mothers.

  • that’s a fantastic story, angela. this town needs more places like that. much respect. thanks for the story and photos, dfunk.

  • Arg…if I knew that was a hospital I would have made sure to go in there…I always thought it was just some boring building.

  • That’s actually not a YMCA, but the Salvation Army’s Booth Memorial Hospital. It was one of many set up across the US back in the days when umwed teenage motherhood was taboo and the girls from proper families were sent to facilities such as Booth, the Daughter’s of Charity’s Marillac homes, or Florence Crittenton homes to have their babies and then put them up for adoption. Usually under the pretense of visiting out of town relatives or some such thing.

    I was a resident of that building there back in the early 80s and it actually changed the direction of my life from being the homeless , pregnant street kid that I was at the time into the person I am today. A parent of two wonderful kids (the oldest of which was born during my residency there)with a great life and I can never forget the staff of that marvelous program for everything they did.

    It made me sad to see the place deteriorate and end up demolished. While I was there, Latino Family Services (now across the street) had started their excellent community services programs on the third floor of the building and there was a child care center open to the community on the second floor across the center hallway from the maternity residential program. There was also a full-service jr/sr high school program set up on the ground floor for both residents and non-residents alike as well as medical facilities.

    Sorry for the loooooong comment, but I just felt like sharing the bit I know about the place that had such a positive impact on a very scared kid back then.